NSA Logo

If there is an opportunity to get in front of an audience, you can bet marketers will find it. The picture to the left illustrates one such example.

The good folks at Coca Cola determined that those concrete poles that serve as safety/security barriers to the entrance to such places as Wal-Mart were not being used to their full potential. So they came up with a cardboard overlay that featured their latest promotion. Hard to miss as you walk through the main entrance, and I offer them a tip of my marketing hat for their creativity.

A while back we talked about how Amazon did something similar.

A good idea is to look for “underutlized real estate” where you might be able to get your message out there. The more unique, and the more clever, the better.

Doing business without advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you are doing, but nobody else does.” – Unknown

Comments Off


I’ll get right to two important points:

1 – Super classy golf tournament at Coffee Creek.

2 – Support of the tournament helps fund Max Dobson’s “Teaching the Disabled Child” class and the Oklahoma Christian University chapter of the American Marketing Association.

Here’s a link to the registration form: AMA Golf Brochure 2016.

Find me at the tournament and I’ll treat you to an ice cream sandwich!

 

Comments Off

The great investing website, Seeking Alpha, ran this article about a lawsuit Procter and Gamble  has filed against a competitor in the razor category for patent infringement, deceptive practices, and a whole bunch of other stuff. You can read the article here if you like. 

What struck me as interesting was how they phrased their rationale for the lawsuit.

P&G’s chief legal officer, Deborah Mojoras, had this to say:

We invest heavily in innovation – and our scientists work tirelessly to provide men with one of the best, most reliable shaving experiences in the world. When a competitor makes false and misleading claims against one of our products and infringes our patents, it’s unfair to consumers, and to our employees and shareholders, and we will challenge those violations.”

 

I think some of this wording may be P&G’s attempt to avoid looking like Goliath picking on David. We all like to root for the underdog, after all, and competition is the thing that makes our beloved free market system work. But all that emotion aside, their point is logical and accurate. And justified. Companies of all size invest  lots of resources working to give their customers (that’s you and me!)  value, and they are rewarded with something of value in return. If companies can’t profitably serve customers, customers can’t be served for very long. The “win-win” of “value-for-value” turns to “lose-lose” pretty quickly. As Dr. Steven Covey liked to say, “No margin, no mission.” 

So in a way, P&G is just looking out for the customer. And no, I’m not being sarcastic!

 

 

Comments Off

In addition to holding records for coaching the most wins  in UCLA basketball history, John Wooden authored several superb books on leadership and how to succeed while staying focused on what is most important in life. 

Wooden often recalled the wisdom of his former college coach, Piggy Lambert. Once, when Lambert was asked by the media at the season’s end how good a job he did as coach that year, Lambert responded, “Ask me in 20 years and we’ll see how successful these boys are. Then I’ll be able to tell you if I succeeded as a coach.”

Wooden obviously went on to be a great success and would often be cited as the source of great inspiration from his former players, and it’s likely that many of them have gone on to inspire people in their lives.

Study a great leader and you’ll often find someone in their back story that powerfully influenced them. Very often, behind every great leader is a great leader.

My bet is you’re the kind of person somebody else will be crediting someday, too.  So thanks for your contributions, leader!

Leaders don’t inspire followers. They inspire other leaders.” – Tom Peters

 

There is a logical part of us that knows economic downturns are inevitable. But emotionally, they’re still hard to accept and even harder to muddle through.

But the truth is, just as a robust economy offers opportunities, so does a downturn.

A downturn may be a good time to grow. If you’ve been wanting to expand, you may be able to acquire assets for your business that were overpriced during the boom times. This is especially true for real estate.

If you’re wanting to build, those construction firms who were too busy to return your calls during the good times may now be very eager to negotiate a price you’ll really like.

Now may be the best time to advertise. Because your competitors have likely scaled back on their advertising, your messages can stand out on a less cluttered landscape. You may also find that ad rates suddenly become easier to negotiate in a downturn.

Your workforce should also be happy to have jobs, so they should be focused more on how to increase their personal productivity and offer stellar customer service than on how to find that “next, better job” that always seems to present itself in an up economy.

It’s been said that we all turn into much better managers during a downturn because the scarcity of resources forces us to make better, smarter decisions and find more innovative solutions.

A downturn certainly isn’t preferred, but it may not be the end of the world, either. If think a downturn suddenly erases all opportunity, consider that success stories like Microsoft, GE, FedEx, Revlon, and Hyatt, and plenty of others, started during a recession.Then go out and make some history of your own!

Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.” - Napoleon

 

 

Comments Off

Every time your team members open a conversation with a new customer or prospect, the very first question they should clearly, enthusiastically ask each one is this:

“How did you find out about us?”

 

This gives you true, direct, voice-of-the customer feedback about what marketing is working and how well. You can also train your people to probe a little and find out not only how they heard about you, but if it’s a particular tactic or campaign they reference, find out what the liked about it, what they remembered most, and so on.

You can experiment with the wording, of course. You may prefer something like, “Thanks for coming in today. Say, How’d you hear about us?” or “Hey, could I ask how you first learned about us?” or “We’re glad to have you here, do you mind sharing, what brought you to us?” Whatever phrasing suits you best, with the goal to make it as conversational as possible. But the bottom line is, you, and your team, need to be in the habit of opening every new customer conversation with this type of very important question.

It could be the best market research you ever get!

I know half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, but I can never find out which half.”-  John Wanamaker

Comments Off

Spoiler Alert: This HUGE movie comes out Friday and everyone is speculating about who the  “Winner” will be. Well, I’ve got the answer: You!

That’s right, if you’re a fan, you’ve already won! The writers, producers, director, cast and crew of this epic undertaking (which cost close to $411 million to make) put their blood, sweat, and tears into making this movie with the ultimate goal of making YOU happy.

So congratulations, you’re the big winner!

That’s how the free market works, after all. Somebody takes a risk (sometimes an incredible risk) to create something of value for a customer, and if the customer agrees it’s valuable then the provider of that value ends up getting value in return, most likely in the form of what we call PROFITS! All that focused effort with YOUR satisfaction in mind.

Isn’t that a rather exciting story of its own?

Any time you build a new business, any time there’s an end-use customer getting a product and enjoying it better than a competitor might be able to offer them, you’ve created wealth for our society. So, the best way for you to make money is to create wealth!” – Paul Zane Pilzer, The Fountain of Wealth

 

 

 

Comments Off

I‘m a huge fan of using guiding principles. In fact, I often suggest trying to replace formal strategic plans with a good set of memorable, actionable guiding principles wherever possible.

You can find more on that HERE if you’re interested.

The idea of forgoing formal strategic plans for a handful of guiding principles may sound a bit far fetched, and granted it may not work for everyone, but when you stop and consider what we’re really trying to accomplish with strategic plans in the first place, which is ACTION, then I think it makes sense to at least take a look.

Here’s what Nordsrom’s did:

In an effort to train its entire team in how to deliver stellar customer service on a consistent basis, they tossed out the giant, three-ring binder that contained all kinds of policies and FAQs regarding customer service. All new hires are now trained with one phrase: “Use your good judgment in all situations.” That’s it.

Of course, there are plenty of stories that are then told in their ongoing training sessions as examples of what kinds of situations might come up, how employees have handled such issues in the past, and what can be learned from both the good and bad outcomes. The guiding principles lead to action, the action can then be studied and refined, and continuous improvement occurs. As the old Shewart Cycle reads, “Plan, Do, Check, Act,” then do it all over again.

Success is a process, not an event, and guiding principles can help keep that process in motion.

I will never put my name on anything that does not have in it the best that is in me.” – John Deere

 

Comments Off

The Digital Doc Team!

You may recall that over the years I’ve noted my love/hate relationship with my cell phone and many things electronic. Thanks to a newly found, newly-formed relationship with the newly-located team at DitigalDoc.com (178th and Western, right next door to the Family Video), I’m now back in love with my electronics.

I had an blog-worthy customer service experience that I just had to share with you back in December. My son & I ran across Heath and his excellent DigitalDoc.com team as we were renting some Christmas movies for our family. They dazzled me with how promptly they fixed his iPad screen, then absolutely astounded me with how they went above and beyond. You see, he was having an issue with one of the apps on the iPad and they had kindly agreed to see if they could help him get it working promptly as part of the repair.

But it didn’t end there, either…

They ended up spending about an additional hour working to get the thing working for him, 30 minutes of which was after closing time. Simply amazing! Yes, we will be back. Yes we will be referring others. Yes, I highly recommend them to you right here and now. Heck, I honestly can’t wait until my next electronic breakdown just so I can send them some more business!

All joking aside, their whole team seriously impressed me and they are a superb example of what we’ve talked about here often, which is that to have MORE business, simply do GOOD business.

Thanks for the great example, guys!

Profit in business comes from repeat customers; customers that boast about your product and service, and that bring friends with them.”W. Edwards Deming

 

Comments Off

Nine years ago this month my son was born. I won’t get all mushy and go on and on about how much I love him and my wife, or how it does indeed change your life (in good ways!) the way everybody says it will, or any of that.

What I will do is give a long overdue “Thanks” to the professional team on the maternity floor at Mercy Hospital who did such a swell job of helping our family navigate that joyous, exciting, and terrifying time. Joyous and exciting to be new parents of a perfectly healthy son, and terrifying to be signing lifetime contracts as new parents! We often think back fondly on that experience thanks to what great care they gave us all.

So even if it’s long overdue, I hope you professionals, you angels of Mercy, know how appreciated you still are!

 

Comments Off